If I hit a pole, do I need to call the police?

If you hit a pole with your car, you should call the police as soon as possible. Hitting a telephone or utility pole with your car can be a safety hazard — if the pole is a power line, there's an immediate risk of electrocution if you leave your car and step on the ground. It's important to call 911 and wait inside the car so trained professionals can help when they arrive on the scene. Depending on the laws in your state, you may also need to report the accident to the police.

What happens if you hit a pole and leave?

If you hit a pole and drive off, even if it's just a pole located in a parking lot, it could be considered an illegal hit-and-run. Rather than fleeing the scene, it's best to report the damage immediately.

Your insurance claim could also be in jeopardy if you flee the scene without filing a police report. Insurance companies often refer to police reports as evidence when processing claims, so it's best to report the incident immediately to the police and your insurance company to ensure that your claim will be processed without an issue.

If I hit a telephone pole, do I have to pay for it?

The city, county, or other local government that maintains the telephone pole may seek compensation from you for the cost to repair the pole. In general, you should file a liability claim with your insurance company so you can avoid paying out of pocket yourself.

How much does it cost if you hit a telephone pole?

If you hit any type of pole, you may have to pay for the damage to your vehicle, the pole, and any other property damaged in the accident, as well as any tickets you receive. If you have collision coverage, your insurance should pay to repair or replace your vehicle. If you also damage the pole, generally speaking, your liability coverage should pay for the damage up to your policy's limit.

Will my insurance go up if I hit a pole?

As with other accidents, there's a chance that your rate will increase after hitting a pole. This is especially true if the cost of repairs is high and you're also cited for a moving violation, such as speeding or driving under the influence. Luckily, these rate increases don't usually stick around forever. According to the Insurance Information Institute, pricing increases after an accident vary by carrier but generally apply to your rate for three years after a claim.